Cyber attacks fuel industry growth

Ctrl IT logoIn today’s digital age we face a new “invisible” threat to the way we operate in our personal lives and in business. Malicious cyber-attacks and network security breaches are becoming a more common occurrence. Any time a system comes under attack it’s bad for those concerned, of course, but good promotion for those in the business of protecting computer networks.

In fact, the more cyber attacks make headlines, the more the security industry grows. As jobs in the ICT sector are projected to rise 16 per cent across the next four years, on the ground demand for trained professionals is expanding exponentially.

Which is why Chisholm is offering a Certificate IV in Computer Systems Technology (ICT41015), specialising in Cyber Security. The course, in its first year, as a pathway qualification towards the Advanced Diploma of Computer Systems Technology (Cyber Security).

And it seems the first student intake is finding they are in demand, even before completing their studies.

There are plans to expand the course, which is the first of its kind offered by Chisholm. “We’re finding there’s a high demand for the course from potential students and also from industry looking for qualified staff,” Chisholm senior Information Technology educator Steven Cahill said.

Demand for website and data protection is undergoing phenomenal growth, according to internet security firm, Ctrl I.T. General manager Leon Rogers says the Richmond firm has been swamped with demand.

Australian businesses and government sites are prone to attacks as they have traditionally been lax with their security, Mr Rogers said.
“We’re hiring an engineer a month. For us it’s a huge problem just keeping pace and finding suitably qualified staff.”

Which is why the firm is taking on four work experience students from Chisholm TAFE’s new specialist Cyber Security course.

The partnership came about as Chisholm staff were seeking industry input into the Advanced Diploma in Computer Systems Technology, specialising in Cyber security. “We’ve been working quite closely with Chisholm and were definitely impressed with the course,” Mr Rogers said.

“We initially discussed taking on two Chisholm candidates, but when we saw the calibre of the shortlisted four, we decided it was too hard to separate them,” he said. “With the business growth we’ve had, we can accommodate them.”

The students will divide their time between studying Chisholm Dandenong’s cyber security Advanced Diploma course next year and working two days a week at Ctrl I.T.

For more information about the course, visit our Computer Technology courses